Author Archives: Catherine

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Pandora Press #5, the Media Issue!

media advert

We’re now accepting submissions for the spring 2013 issue of Pandora Press,  the Swansea Feminist Network zine. The theme of this issue is MEDIA. We’re mainly interested articles and opinion pieces, but are also interested in the following (many of these, such as the reviews, will not need to fit into the theme):

Poetry
Short Fiction
Cartoons
Artwork/illustrations
Reviews:
– Films
– Music
– Blogs
– Zines
Interviews
Swansea Women’s News/Events

The theme MEDIA is a vague one, open to broad interpretation, but with some sort of focus on gender/sexuality/feminism. Here are some ideas where you could go with this:

– Advertising
– Print media: magazines, glossies, newspapers
– Online media: websites, blogs, social networking, memes, “trolling”
– Music
– Film
– Theatre
– Independent publishing (i.e. zines/pamphlets)
– Books
– Art/photography/fine art
– Television: soaps, documentaries, current affairs, reality TV, etc

Don’t feel limited by these ideas though; even if you want to write/design something that you feel doesn’t quite fit into this theme, submit it anyway and it will probably be featured (if not in this issue then certainly in a subsequent issue)!

Contributors must be from South Wales, preferably the Swansea area, and must self-identify as women. Just email your ideas, questions, or submissions to the editor Cath at PANDORAPRESSZINEatGMAIL.COM.

***Deadline: 31 January 2013***

NB: we are unable to pay writers for their contributions at this time, but you should consider this writing opportunity as a great chance to share your thoughts and creativity with others, and an encouraging and supportive environment in which you can develop your portfolio/CV!

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Event: SFN New Year Swap Shop!

Happy Christmas feminists!  Did you get a load of unwanted gifts this year?  Are you thinking about clearing out your wardrobe to make way for the January Sales bargains?  Why not bring your unwanted stuff to the Swansea Feminist Network New Year Swap Shop, and trade it in for something you’ll love!

14th January 2012
Swansea Women’s Centre (women-only venue)
2pm – 5pm

 

HOW IT WORKS

Sort through your stuff for any unwanted, good-quality clothes, gift sets, shoes, hats, bags, craft supplies, CDs, DVDs, musical instruments, or accessories. All items must be in good condition; clothing must be washed and ironed.

Pay a £2 entry fee and receive 2 tokens. Each item can be bought for 1 token. Each item you bring is worth 1 token. Tokens can be bought seperately for £1 each. Bring as much as you want – the more you bring, the more you can take!

Drinks, cakes and zines will also be sold on the day.

Please invite other people who you think might be interested and help spread the word!  You can RSVP on Facebook here.

UK Feminista Summer School 2011: Review

Two weeks ago, a few SFN members attended UK Feminista’s Summer School 2011 at Birmingham, where 500 feminists of all genders attended to learn more about feminist activism and issues surrounding UK feminism.  It was heartening to see so many passionate feminists at this event, most of whom asked intelligent questions and provided some interesting anecdotes and advice of their own.

First we attended an introductory talk held by the organisers, closely followed by Feminist Resistance: the past, present, and future of activism.  Speaker Rosalind Miles was fantastic, providing the perfect response to the question “Why are you a feminist?” – “Why aren’t you?”

Next, there was a lunch break, during which time we attended The Colour of Beauty: race, gender and the beauty industry.  Personally, I was very disappointed that this workshop was on during lunch, as I felt it was too important an issue not to be placed in a more sociable time slot; plus, this was my favourite workshop of the day!  The facilitators Sandhya Sharma and Chitra Nagarajan divided the room into groups of around 8, gave each group one or two mainstream beauty magazines, and asked us to tear out every image of a person of colour, and tack it to the wall on our left.  The resulting wall of images took us by surprise – the people of colour found in the pages were usually either celebrities whose lives were being picked apart by the likes of Heat magazine (e.g. Whitney Houston’s daughter’s drug habit), or they were fashion models featured in ads where their race was stereotyped (in adverts such as this).

After the morning talks, we had to choose between the numerous workshops on during the afternoon, a decision that proved to be very difficult given the interesting topics on offer!  Our first choice was The Role of Nonviolent Direct Action in Feminism, which featured many inspiring and passionate speakers including activist and London Feminist Network founder Finn Mackay, and Tamsin Omond from Climate Rush.  Tamsin’s speech was particularly inspiring, providing us with plenty of pithy quotes that we shared via Twitter using the hashtag #femschool, including the suffragette slogan “deeds not words”.  Alison Dear, coordinator of OBJECT’s Feminist Fridays, showed us a video of OBJECT’s Feminist Friday action at Tesco, which encouraged us to be much louder at SFN’s next Feminist Friday!

After lunch, we attended a lovely workshop run by Emma Moore of Pink Stinks, where she discussed their work and future campaigns.  What was particularly interesting about her speech was the discovery that Pink Stinks, an organisation that has been featured extensively in mainstream press, is run by only two women, both working mothers!  It was saddening to hear the amount of criticism and vitriolic comments they have received for their work, including claims that they are bad parents (one need only read the Daily Mail’s coverage of the campaign to get an understanding of the kind of backlash encountered).

A discussion on women living in the Arab Spring, led by Nesrine Malik, closed the day’s workshops.  Afterwards, the organisers led the attendees outside, where we all stood in the courtyard spelling out the words “FEMINISM IS BACK”.  An aerial photograph was taken of this; we’re all very excited to see it!

That evening Birmingham Fems held an after-party at a local bar, where they laid on a vegan-friendly buffet, played awesome feminist music, and held a feminist pub quiz (SFN’s team name was “This is What a Drunk Feminist Looks Like”!).  It was a lovely atmosphere, very relaxed and cosy, and we got a chance to mingle with some of the other attendees.

The following day, we dragged our slightly-hungover selves to the opening workshop, which perked us up and got us back into our angry-militant-feminist moods: Defending Women’s Reproductive Rights.  The speakers, Darinka Aleksic from Abortion Rights and former MP Dr. Evan Harris, were great.  It was frightening to learn how the government has increased its efforts to restrict women’s access to abortions, handing reproductive health advisory services over to religious, anti-choice organisations.  Aleksic informed us of the lies that such organisations spread to pregnant women seeking abortions when they seek counselling, e.g. that abortion increases the risk of breast cancer, and that they would birth the aborted “child” at home a few days after the procedure.  Another shocking discovery was learning of the arrival of American Christian pro-life groups in the UK, and their extreme tactics used to restrict abortion access.  (It’s impossible to condense such a dense topic in one paragraph; for more info, check out the Abortion Rights website. Adele from SFN also wrote a great blog post on this topic here).

After a break, we attended Mobilising Men: Engaging Men in Feminist Activism.  This workshop was met with very mixed reviews, and was arguably the most widely-criticised of the whole weekend.  Some rightly criticized speaker Matt McCormack Evans’ use of the phrase “both genders” rather than “all genders”, and his inability to acknowledge anyone outside the gender binary.  Others argued that Matt McCormack Evans came across as condescending when urging us to include men in our activism; as blogger Madam J-Mo noted, “it was troublesome to have a man stand up and tell women what to do (never mind clap his hands to silence us at one point)”.  Others argued that his comments that “men experience sexism too” were offensive.  I would also add that the workshop seemed rushed and poorly structured, as if the facilitator had thrown it together at the last minute – it didn’t seem to provide us with anything we didn’t already know, and relied too heavily on audience input.  The workshop was derailed for a good 15 minutes by a discussion on whether we ought to rename “feminism”.  At a feminist conference, this seemed like a complete waste of time, and only served to convince most of us that shying away from the F word will do us no favours, and only serves to distract us from more pressing issues.

After lunch, we attended Not For Sale: Resisting the Sex Industry, led by Anna van Heeswijk from OBJECT.  The weekend was brought to a close for us with Everyday Activism: Promoting Feminism in Everyday Life, a fairly disappointing talk which also relied too heavily on audience input, and suffered a derailment by those who insisted on discussing the merits of the word “feminism”.

My main criticism was the lack of intersectionality at this event – there was a strong black presence, and a few great workshops on race, but little to no representation from transgendered, LGBTQ, or disabled women.  There was also no discussion of class issues, and no presence on any of the panels from sex-positive feminists.  This may well have been due to the lack of women available to run workshops on the aforementioned issues, but I feel that a bigger effort perhaps needed to be made to make sure that these groups were better represented at such a large-scale event. Furthermore, as many have pointed out, it seemed fairly incongruous to hold a workshop on the inclusion of men in feminist activism, but nothing on the inclusion of LGBTQ or disabled women.  Surely our first priority as feminists is to mobilise women from all social groups, before moving onto men?

Another minor criticism, from a more personal stance, was that the “getting to know each other” aspect of the weekend could’ve been a little more structured, so that we could all participate, rather than just trying to talk to the people sat around us when we could find some time between talks.

Despite its problems, the weekend was a success, as it proved to be well organised, informative, and inspiring.  Good job, UK Feminista, and thank you for providing us with such a lovely space for us feminists to get together and meet – we’ll see you next year!

Other interesting blog posts on this event: 

Women’s Views on News
Mary Tracy
La Petite Feministe Anglaise
The Feminist Companion
The Guardian
Womankind 

(written by Cath Elms, media officer of SFN)

SFN zine – Pandora Press!

We’ve a meeting about the Swansea Feminist Network zine yesterday, where we decided an official title for the zine – Pandora Press!  We’re looking for submissions for our first ever issue, which will be released in time for our Music Fundraiser at the end of July (details about the fundraiser here).  The theme is OUR FEMINIST HEROES.  Write about a feminist who inspires you – a politician, a relative, a musician, an actor, a philanthropist, a medic, a writer, a goddess, a good friend, anything you like!  There’s more info on the kind of thing we’re looking for here.  We’ve only had a few submissions so far, so please consider writing something for us!

We’ve also got an idea for a centrefold feature – we’ve got 5 questions that we’d like some of you guys to answer in less than 50 words, and all answers will be published anonymously.  Even if you don’t intend to write a full-length submission, we’d love to hear your answers to some of these questions!

a) Who is your hero?
b) What makes a feminist hero?
c) Sum up, in one word, what feminism means to you.
d) Who first inspired you to explore feminism?
e) What is your favourite feminist book?

To send us your answers, either reply to this email, tweet us, send us a Facebook message, or email me at pandorapresszineATgmailDOTcom.

The deadline is 17th July, so get writing girls!

Cath (Pandora Press editor)

Save the Women’s Centre!

We have just received some devastating news. The Women’s Centre in Swansea will close down at the end of July as the funding they were banking on to stay open has not been granted by the Welsh Assembly Government. Unless a miracle happens, and money is found by next week, this will happen.

The Women’s Centre has been running for over thirty years, and is the only remaining centre of its kind in Wales.  The Women’s Centre provides general advice, support and information for women on a range of issues, including domestic violence, education, sexual health, health and abuse. They provide support and self help groups, Crèche facilities, a library, training courses and volunteering opportunities, and a drop-in with tea, coffee and the chance to socialise.

We can’t let this closure go ahead.  To help, you can:

  • Write to Sian James MP and other female councillors, such as Erika Kirchner.
  • Write a letter of complaint to the Welsh Assembly Government.
  • Write to your local newspaper and ask them to report this injustice.
  • Attend the Swansea Feminist Network’s fundraiser on the 29th July in order to raise money to keep the centre open.
  • DONATE in any way you can! We will be setting up a JustGiving page for donations, but in the meantime you can contact us at swanseafeministnetworkATgmailDOTcom to donate time or money.
  • Most importantly: spread the word! Tell everyone you know.

We will keep you posted on any news developments.

Love, SFN x